Advertising Question Answered: What’s The Best Point Of Contact To Mention In My Advertising?

Transcript:

You have an incredibly powerful, simple message. But are you screwing it up by blah, blah, blahing at the end of your ads?

Tom Wanek, here, and you’re watching Wizard Marketing TV, where business owners learn persuasive tools and techniques to spark miraculous growth.

Stay tuned, and we’ll talk do’s and dont’s when it comes to ending your ads.

In today’s episode, we answer a question from a viewer. Ron M. from Illinois asks, “I advertise my heating and cooling company on the radio, should I mention both my company website AND phone number in our ads? Or, should I just stick with my phone number?”

Well Ron, there’s no hard n’ fast rules here. But generally, I do not put my client’s phone number into their ads when I advertise on radio.

If I’ve done my job right—and you become the company your prospective customer thinks of first and feels best about when she has a need for what you sell—I’m confident she’s gonna find a way to contact you.

Now, each situation is different.

Retailers—with a single location—might consider mentioning their location by saying something like, “Barbara’s Boutique, located at the corner of 5th and Main.

But in your situation, location isn’t important since you go to your customer’s home.

So back to phone number … why don’t I typically mention my client’s phone number in their ads?

Well, for one thing, listeners are gonna have difficulty remembering it, and likely won’t be in a place where it’s convenient for them to write it down.

Yes, sometimes the company phone number is catchy, or leverages a phone word or vanity number like 1-800-GOT-JUNK. So, in this case, mentioning the phone number would be a good idea. Remember … I said there are no hard n’ fast rules here.

Still, most often than not, I’m going to vote for the simplest route and direct prospective customers to the company website.

Why?

Cause they’re likely to go there anyways. And it’s usually the easiest point of contact to remember. Heck, if they get stuck and forget part of it … Google will take them all the way to the Promise Land.

Now, the biggest reason why I don’t put my client’s phone number into the ad?

Because radio has limited display. In other words, I only have 30 or 60 seconds worth of copy to persuade my prospective customer. That’s not a lot of time.

Each word is precious. So am I gonna waste valuable real estate by stuffing and cramming each ad with the client’s phone number, physical address, website address, height, weight, eye and hair color, social security number and everything else under the sun?

Not a chance. Your customer is smart. She’ll find you. Trust me on this, Ron. In fact, legendary advertising executive, David Ogilvy once said, “Your customer isn’t stupid, she is your wife.”

She’s your wife, Ron. And you don’t wanna land in hot water.

All joking aside … the bottom line is this: Don’t dilute the persuasiveness of your ads because you felt it necessary to mention every point of contact for your business. Or, even that you decided to cram your phone number down your listeners’ throats cause you wanted to make sure they remember it.

Alright, Ron, my man … hope this helps. Thanks a million for sending in your question.

Now Marketing Wizards, did you like this video? Then do me a huge favor … please subscribe and share it with peeps all across the YouTubes and the Interwebs.

And let me hear from you. Send in your marketing and advertising questions. Hit me up at tom@tomwanek.com, and I’ll give you an answer right here.

And remember, we’re in this together. I’ve got your back. I’ll see you real soon.

My YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/tomwanek
Consulting on my website: http://www.tomwanek.com/consulting

How To Market New Products Or Services

Transcript:

Once in a blue moon … you unearth a gem. The proverbial diamond in a rough. Wouldn’t it be a sin against the world not to share its beauty?

You bet it would.

Tom Wanek, here, and you’re watching Wizard MarketingTV, where business owners learn persuasive tools and techniques to spark miraculous growth.

Stay tuned, and get the scoop on a little-known research book thats sure to change how you market your products or services.

[intro]

Okay, so I’m gonna be upfront with you. I really don’t read a lot of marketing books. Sure, I devoured all the classics. Still, for the life of me I couldn’t name the latest and greatest marketing and advertising book topping the best-seller list.

But you’re a marketing Wizard, you say. How can this be?

Oh, no! I’ve been exposed as a fraud.

I dunno. Maybe it’s the non-conformist in me. More likely than not, it’s because I want to know the root of an idea’s origins. I want to know WHY something works. So I’ve developed my persuasive prowess by studying neurology, psychology, biology, and the arts.

That’s probably how I stumbled upon a little-known research book titled, Diffusion of Innovations by Everette M. Rogers. It’s a book every Marketing Wizard should read. And it definitely ranks as a classic.

Now, don’t get your undies in a bunch about the “innovations” part of the title. Yes, when Roger’s speaks of innovations, he’s referring to new products or services being introduced to the marketplace. But, the concepts found in his book provides any Marketing Wizard with a rock-solid blueprint for persuading customers to buy from you—even if what you’re selling has been around longer than Jerry Lewis.

Is he still alive?

Just look at all the dog-eared pages and highlights I made. Lots of good marketing mojo in this book for sure. Like this:

“In developing a favorable or unfavorable attitude toward an innovation, an individual may mentally apply the new idea to his or her present or anticipated future situation before deciding whether or not to try it,” says Rogers. “This vicarious trial involves the ability to think hypothetically and counterfactually and to project into the future: What if I adopt this innovation? Forward planning is involved at the persuasion stage.”

Helping your customers to imagine doing the thing that you want them to do. That’s what Rogers is talking about here. And that’s what you’re trying to make happen with your marketing as well. So let’s get knee deep into the five factors that influence the spread of new ideas and lead to widespread adoption:

Number One: Relative Advantage – the degree to which an innovation is perceived to be better than the product or service it supersedes.

Naturally, the greater the perceived relative advantage of an innovation, the more rapid its rate of adoption will be.

Your goal here is to frame the buying conversation to favor you. Since we know that customers naturally contrast and compare the differences among their available options, you must make an apples-to-oranges comparison—rising above the competition to become the obvious choice.

Now, logical, reason why marketing is important … but don’t forget to speak to your customer’s emotions. Tap into an emotional benefit that drives your customer’s desire—one that your customer is willing to pay for.

Marketing and advertising that speaks to a dominant, driving emotion is much more powerful and persuasive than copy that makes a logical argument alone.

Number Two: Compatibility – the degree to which an innovation is perceived to be consistent with existing values, past experiences and the needs of potential adopters.

Products and services that are deemed less compatible or incompatible with the norms of a social system will not be adopted as rapidly as those that are.

Please don’t expect your customers to adopt a new belief system. You can’t please all. Remember, only weasel brands try’n snuggle up to every customer in the marketplace. So find a group of customers with a social system that your products and services are compatible with.

Number Three: Complexity – the degree to which which an innovation is perceived to be difficult to understand and use.

Simplicity is a better way to think about this.

Marketers have known for awhile now that uncertainty is the costly side-effect of overwhelming your customers with too much choice. Generally speaking, the more options customers have at their fingertips, the more indecisive they’ll become. And complexity often creates the desire for simplicity.

The bottom line: Products and service that are easier to understand and use are adopted more rapidly—especially compared to those innovations requiring you to develop new skills and understanding.

Number Four: Trial-ability – the degree to which an innovation can be experimented with on a limited basis.

New products that can be tried on an installment plan will be adopted more rapidly. Marketers have leveraged “try before you buy” for decades.

Food samples at the grocery store …
Pay nothing now …
Money-back guarantees.

All are examples of trial-ability. Your mission here is to reduce risk. You gotta get people to sample your wares … give ‘em a taste so they know your product is irresistible.

Number Five: Observability – the degree to which the results of an innovation are visible to others. See, the easier it is for someone to see that your product or service actually works, the more likely they are to buy from you.

Demonstrate virtues of your products or services with product demonstrations. You can do this in-store, or online with a YouTube video.

You should also increase your observability with testimonials and case studies. Exhaust every option to show customers the performance of your products or services. Got it? Good.

So, there you have it … the five factors that influence the spread of new ideas. Now, there’s plenty of more good marketing mojo in this book—too much to cover here—so I strongly encourage you to get your own copy. I’m keeping mine, and I can’t recommend it enough.

Speaking of recommendations, please subscribe and share this video with your peeps all across the YouTubes and the Interwebs.

Now, my friends, it’s time to hear from you. Hit me up. Send in your marketing and advertising questions to tom@tomwanek.com, and I’ll give you an answer right here.

And always remember, we’re in this together. I’ve got your back. I’ll see you real soon.

My YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/tomwanek
Consulting on my website: http://www.tomwanek.com/consulting

Copywriting Tip: Advertise Like A Rhinoceros

Transcript:

Woah, you look a lil’ dizzy, my friend. Is it that ad that’s got your head spinnin’ like a merry-go-round?

Tom Wanek, here, and you’re watching Wizard Marketing TV, where business owners learn persuasive tools and techniques to spark miraculous growth.

Stay tuned, and I’ll give you a quick and simple recommendation that’ll untangle your message and boost the persuasive prowess of your ads.

Today’s episode is quick and to the point. And I decided to give you this down and dirty recommendation after receiving a lot of ad copy ideas from clients that are all making the same fatal mistake … cramming so many points into a single ad that it will make your head spin.

So many advertisers out there want to talk about their great customer service … bargain prices … vast selection … and much, much more … but you can’t accomplish this all in a single ad.

My partner Roy H. Williams says, “It is foolish to believe a single ad can ever tell the entire story. The most effective, persuasive and memorable ads are those most like a rhinoceros. They will each make a single point very powerfully. An advertiser with seventeen different things to say should commit to a campaign of at least seventeen different ads, with each ad being given sufficient repetition to accomplish retention in the mind of the prospect.”

So are you blunting your message by cramming too many points into your ads?

If so, your message is like a porcupine. Don’t be a porcupine.

Now, I know many of you fall into this trap of cramming too many points into your ads cause your eager to tell the world all about your greatness. Hey, that’s understandable. You want your customers to know these things. You want to get credit for everything that makes you remarkable.

But keep in mind, the conscious brain can juggle only seven pieces of data at any one moment. Throwing too much information at your customer will cause a seventeen car pileup on the persuasion super-highway.

So take a deep breath, and remember this: Advertise like a rhinoceros. Make a single, powerful point. And when you make several cohesive points over time … you’ll have yourself one heck of an advertising campaign … a campaign that’ll cause a small army of customers to walk through your door.

I can hear the cash register singing already.

Now my fellow Wizards, if you like this video, give it a big thumbs up and share it with your friends all across the YouTubes and the Interwebs.

Most importantly, send me your marketing and advertising questions and I’ll give you an answer right here. Hit me up at tom@tomwanek.com.

Remember, my friend, we’re in this together … I’ve got your back. I’ll see you real soon.

My YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/tomwanek
Consulting on my website: http://www.tomwanek.com/consulting

Brand Extension Versus Straddling

Transcript:

Decisions … decisions … decisions. Hmmm. I believe it was Jimmy Buffet who said, “Indecision may or may not be my problem.”

Tom Wanek, here, and you’re watching Wizard Marketing TV, where business owners learn persuasive tools and techniques to spark miraculous growth.

Keep watching, and I’ll explain where your indecisiveness rears its ugly head in your marketing, and how can lead to sales constipation.

Boy-oh-boy … my dear ole dad is quite the character. He hates when you beat around the bush, and becomes easily frustrated by any waffling whatsoever. When a moment of indecision arises, he’ll bark to, “$H*! or get off the pot!”

Yes, it’s a bit crude, I know. As a kid, it would sometimes scare you spitless. These days, it really cracks me up.

But dad’s words of wisdom will snap you out of your funk, and spring you into action. And I often imagine my dad saying these words whenever I see a company engaged in straddling—a concept originated by Harvard professor, Michael Porter.

Straddling occurs when you attempt to occupy two or more positions in the marketplace without the full commitment of your actions. Make no mistake, straddling is bad for your business … whether it be driven by indecision, ignorance or greed.

So here are three gosh darn good reasons why you should avoid such a strategy:

Right off the bat, straddling drains your limited resources, and spreads you too thin. Most small business owners just don’t have the resources necessary to occupy more than one position in the marketplace. Often, this approach requires additional staffing, inventory, and advertising. And as you know, small business owners must spend every resource wisely.

Number two: Straddling prevents you from developing a unified vision. What happens when your employees find themselves confronted by conflicting organizational goals and objectives? Do they know which goal bows a knee to the other? Do you?

Straddling often sparks conflict between what you are saying and who you are being, which shatters credibility. Employees—as well as your customers—need to know precisely what your company stands for, and what it opposes. It’s tough to be credible and stand for anything when you straddle.

Number three: Straddling dilutes your marketing message, resulting in watered-down, limp ad copy. Powerful marketing messages make a statement by choosing who to lose. Weak marketing messages attempt to please everyone, and in the end, please no one. Nuff said.

Well … one more thing … please don’t justify your straddling strategy by calling it a brand extension. That’s not gonna fly.

Let me say this plainly: I’m NOT suggesting there’s never a reason to extend your brand. Nonsense. That’s a decision you may need to make one day. But just remember, a successful brand extension must demonstrate your company’s commitment to fulfilling the customer’s felt need. You do this by providing value, and then building upon that value year after year.

In other words, $H*! or get off the pot.

Now, Marketing Wizards … do me a solid and please subscribe and share this video with your peeps all across the YouTubes and the Interwebs.

And send in your marketing and advertising questions. Hit me up at tom@tomwanek.com, and I’ll give you an answer right here.

Remember, we’re in this together. I’ve got your back. I’ll see you real soon.

Thanks a bunch for watching Wizard Marketing TV!

My YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/tomwanek
Consulting on my website: http://www.tomwanek.com/consulting

How To Maximize Every Penny Spent On Advertising

Transcript:

What’s that you say? Your advertising is dragging in the dirt? You’re just not seeing the kinda sales spike you’d like to see?

Well, I’m concerned that you may be sabotaging your advertising efforts, my friend … and it has nothing to do with poorly written ads, or choice of media.

Tom Wanek, here, and you’re watching Wizard Marketing TV, where business owners learn persuasive tools and techniques to spark miraculous growth.

Stay tuned to make sure that you’re maximizing every penny spent on advertising.

The bottom line: Delivering a poor customer experience may be costing you sales.

Point is, don’t spend your hard-earned moola on advertising until you’ve fixed all of the leaks in your boat. Or as legendary ad executive, Bill Bernbach put it, “It’s always a mistake to make good advertising for a bad product.”

No doubt about it … shortcomings and pitfalls in customer experience can undermine marketing and advertising efforts in a heartbeat. I see it happen all the time. And I bet you do too.

Things like:

Grumpy Employee … openly complaining about long hours, work conditions, or other co-workers. You’re likely to encounter the grumblings of this employee as you’re held hostage while standing in the checkout line.

Old School Website (circa 1996). Ya know the one… clip art, flashing GIFs, confusing and cluttered design. Nuff said.

TMI Employee … chatting non-stop with co-workers about the “kick-ass” party that went down the night before, and how she’s got a “wicked” hangover that’s been kicking her ass all day long. Thanks for sharing, right?

Automated Phone System Hell. C’mon, we’ve all been there. The endless loop of confusing menu options, pushing this button and that button… all just to speak to an automated voice recording or a customer support rep named “Bob” who speaks with a curiously strong foreign accent. No offense to you “Bob,” I’m sure your a nice guy and all. Think that’s bad? Well, how about …

Jackass Employee, my personal favorite … careening down the isle, pushing a stock cart with no intention on giving you the right of way.

Now, this list is by no means comprehensive. I’m sure you can think of plenty more items to add. (Feel free to do so by commenting below.) But these are just the problems that bother me most.

So what can you do about it? How can you elevate your customer experience factor, and maximize every penny you spend on advertising?

Well, worry no more! Here are Six Suggestions to improve the experience you provide:

Numero Uno … First, make sure every person in your organization understands that the customer’s needs are to be placed on a pedestal. Heck. It’s the reason you’re in business, and it’s the reason your employees have a job. But don’t stop short. Spell out exactly what it means to put the customer on a pedestal. Gain clarity. This description should include how employees should behave when on the job, especially in the presence of customers.

Number Two … Train employees to be well-versed on the products and services you sell. And be sure your staff knows exactly how to handle special cases such as out-of-stock or backordered items, returns, and special order items.

Number Three … Install back up systems during busy periods, and have plenty of staff available to help customers. Do this for every point of contact with your business — whether it be in-store, on the phone, or via email. In other words, never allow a single customer to fall through the cracks.

Number Four … Get down in the trenches. Yes, this means you. It drives me bonkers whenever I hear a business owner talk about their customer’s wants and needs — yet they hardly ever spend time on the floor, or on the phone talking with their customers. Hey, if for some reason this doesn’t work for you, at least get the scoop from your front-line employees who are in direct, daily contact with your customer.

Number Five … Create a Customer Experience Factor Checklist to help you grade your ongoing performance and update your systems regularly.

And Number Six … Fire any employee who refuses to comply with your prime directive of placing the customer’s needs on a pedestal. Yes, I said fire. Your business lives or dies by the customer experience you provide. There’s just no space for an employee who falls short of delighting the hell outta your customers.

Got it? As you can see, it’s silly to blame advertising for all your company’s ills. So before you play the blame game, take a clear-eyed and objective look at the experience you’re delivering, and I promise you’ll convert more customers and increase the effectiveness of your advertising dollars by multiples.

Now my fellow Wizards, if you liked this video … give it a big thumbs up, will ya? And please share this video with people you know, like and trust.

And send me your marketing and advertising questions and I’ll give you an answer right here. Hit me up at tom@tomwanek.com.

Remember, we’re in this together … I’ve got your back. I’ll see you real soon.

Thanks a bunch for watching Wizard Marketing TV!

My YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/tomwanek
Consulting on my website: http://www.tomwanek.com/consulting

Are You Making This Deadly Marketing Mistake? (And How To Fix It If You Are)

Transcript:

Successful companies protect and project credibility, leading consumers to anticipate a trustworthy buying experience. Are you deliberately taking steps to protect yours?

Tom Wanek, here, and you’re watching Wizard Marketing TV, where business owners learn persuasive tools and techniques to spark miraculous growth.

Stay tuned and I’ll share three simple questions that will make sure you’re not shooting yourself in your foot when it comes to your marketing and advertising.

Recently, I was on a conference call with the head of a major trade organization with more than 700 members that belong the in-home service category.

During our call, she mentioned that one of the biggest challenges facing her organization is getting members to understand the importance of delivering on promises such as warranties, on-time delivery and upfront pricing.

In other words, talk is cheap. And you had better walk the walk.

See, one of the deadliest credibility killers in communication is conflict between what you are saying and who you are being.

Harmony between your actions and words elevates credibility. But conflict causes credibility to crumble and erode. Your customer’s brain immediately recognizes any contradiction, and reacts by alerting its finely-tuned B.S. meter.

Steven Pinker, Director of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, says, “The search for signs of trustworthiness makes us into mind readers, alert for any twitch of inconsistency that betrays a sham.”

But let’s be real. Inconsistencies can happen to the most virtuous among us. Not everyone is a scam artist or a scumbag.

So here are three straightforward questions that every Marketing Wizard should ask to align their actions and words.

Question number one: What are your company’s defining characteristics? What makes your business special? What are those values that your business stands for, or against?  What promises or claims are being made in your advertising? How about on your website?  Oh, and don’t forget about the unspoken expectations customers might have of you. Be diligent. Flush everything out, my friend.

Question number two: What signals do your decisions send? Look at your business through the eyes of the customer. Crawl in to their skin. First, begin with the basics: Review your hours-of-operation. Comb through your policies and procedures. Examine the decisions that your employees make. And most importantly, gather customer feedback, comments and reviews of your products or services.

Finally, question number three ask yourself: Is there conflict between what you are saying and who you are being?Take this seriously. Remember, your company’s reputation is on the line here. Move quickly to reconcile any contradiction or disconnect:  Whack the clichés. Close all loopholes. Substantiate every claim. Investigate any complaint or concern.

Again, get in the routine of using the Three Questions of Message Alignment to ensure that your marketing message remains consistent. Create a checklist for it. After all, your company’s credibility depends on it.

Now my fellow Wizards, if you liked this video and found it helpful, click that thumbs up button, will ya? And please share this video with people you know, like and trust.

Most importantly of all, send me your marketing and advertising questions. Hit me up at tom@tomwanek.com and I’ll give you an answer right here.

And always remember, we’re in this together … I’ve got your back. I’ll see you real soon.

Thanks a bunch for watching Wizard Marketing TV!

My YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/tomwanek

Revolutionize Your Marketing Strategy In Just 3 Easy Steps

Transcription:

You’ve got a problem, and you need to reinvent your company. But where do you turn for creative solutions and inspiration?

Tom Wanek here, and you’re watching Wizard Marketing TV where business owners learn persuasive tools and techniques to spark miraculous growth.

Keep watching and I’ll share how you can create some new marketing mojo for your company.

As we discussed during our last episode, the success of your business is related to standing out … not fitting in. But far too often, business owners dive headfirst into the pitfall of nowhere by looking within their own industry for ideas and inspiration.

Unfortunately this approach leads to stagnant and stale marketing. But jogging your brain cells and creating a marketing revolution is easy when you apply a little Business Problem Topology.

Business Problem Topology is the process of identifying a parallel but unrelated business or category that faced a similar challenge, and adapting their solution to overcome yours.

So what problems are inherent in selling your products or services? What attitudes or responses have become commonplace?

First, realize that your problem is not unique. I promise you … somebody out there has already solved the problem you face, or one that is very similar.

So let’s see how to apply Business Problem Topology to create a new framework that’ll spark your creativity:

Step One: Identify a parallel, but unrelated business that shares a problem with similar defining characteristics that you’d like to solve.

Step Two: Uncover how that business overcame their problem.

Step Three: Look for ideas, inspiration and solutions, and apply what you’ve discovered.

Yep, I told you this was easy.

Now let’s see how Clockworks Home Services, Inc. has applied Business Problem Topology to create the nation’s #1 heating and air conditioning franchise.

Being handcuffed to a repair technician’s schedule is something we’ve all experienced. Sure, they’ll come out to your home and fix your furnace, but only by further disrupting your life.”Anytime between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.” is the closest you’ll get to nailing down an arrival time.

Amazingly, most in-home service companies completely disregard the customer’s time, preferring to brag about being the “largest” or having the “highest-quality.”

But not Clockwork Home Services. The company has built a number of America’s most successful in-home service franchises, including One Hour Heating & Air Conditioning, by adapting the Fed-Ex or Dominos Pizza on-time delivery guarantee to its own delivery of on-time service.

Here’s how it works: Schedule an appointment and an experienced repair technician will show up at your home within a one-hour service window. If the technician arrives after the one-hour window expires — even just one teeny tiny second — the entire service call is free. Including parts and labor.

To further ensure your time isn’t wasted, each service truck arrives fully stocked and loaded with more than $15,000 in parts, avoiding those time-consuming trips “back to the shop.”

By applying Business Problem Topology — One Hour created a marketing revolution that’s boomed their business. And it’s no coincidence that the company enjoys a 90 percent closure rate on every in-bound call they receive. Now that’s impressive!

So Marketing Wizards, how do you plan to use Business Problem Topology to revolutionize your industry? Leave a comment below, I’d love to hear what you’ve come up with.

Now, did you like this video? Then do me a huge favor and please subscribe and share it with people you know.

And let me hear from you. Send in your marketing and advertising questions. Hit me up at tom@tomwanek.com.

And always remember … we’re in this together. I’ve got your back. I’ll see you real soon.

Thanks a bunch for watching Wizard Marketing TV!

My YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/tomwanek

Own The Marketing Strategy Edge

Transcript:

Do you have what it takes to become a market leader … to dominate your industry? Do you own the edge?

Tom Wanek here, and you’re watching Wizard Marketing TV where business owners learn persuasive tools and techniques to spark miraculous growth.

I’ve said many times before, if you wanna grow your business … well, then your success is directly related to standing out … not fitting in. Stay tuned, and see why this is especially true—even if you’re already a leader in your product category. I’ll see YOU on the other side.

You are guided by a nervous system that is programmed to avoid risk and the pain of loss. And what you stand to lose or gain from your available choices impacts every decision you make.

Emotion is the driving force used by your nervous system to influence your decisions.

Feelings of fear and trepidation are triggered by the unknown. These emotions prompt you to invest your resources cautiously.

Feelings of trust, comfort and security are triggered by things familiar:  Family and friends.  Ethnic background.  Political affiliations.

Humans have long trusted the wisdom of groups as a survival mechanism.

Neuroscientist Gregory Berns explains, “There is, of course,  great value in belonging to a group. Safety in numbers, for one. But there is also a mathematical explanation for why the brain is so willing to give up its own opinions: a group of people is more likely to be correct about something than an individual.”

In essence, your natural instinct is to follow the herd. And it’s counterintuitive for you to venture out on your own. That’s why many business owners continually look to their competitors for ideas and inspiration. But beware: this approach is littered with fool’s gold.

Here’s what you must always remember: A business revolution can never be the result of copying the strategy and tactics employed by your competition. Your success is directly related to standing out, not fitting in. And you must battle human nature if you wish to create a unique point of differentiation for your business.

Why is being unique so important?

Because marketing strategies are frequency dependent, which means the value of your marketing message declines as it becomes more common in the marketplace. The greater the number of copycats, the more difficult it will be for your customer to pick out the differences and choose among you.

Once all competitors have adopted a similar strategy, no one owns the edge. The arms race continues. Which is why you must work even harder once you’ve achieved market leader status.

Hey, you didn’t think it would get any easier with that big, bright red target on your back, did you? This is nooooooo time to get fat and lazy.

Maintaining your status as a market leader requires that you continually raise the bar by improving your company’s value through product innovation, customer intimacy and operational efficiency.

Market leaders never rest. They relinquish no ground.
Remember, ‘safety in numbers’ dictates that your competition will emulate what’s working in the marketplace. Resting on your laurels is a surefire way to invite parity.

So, I have just one question for you: Do you have the courage to break from the herd and own the edge?

You’re a Marketing Wizard, so of course you have what it takes.

Next episode, I share a sure technique you can use to create a business revolution in your industry.

But for now … did you like this video? Then do me a huge favor and please subscribe and share it with people you know.

And let me hear from you. Send in your marketing and advertising questions. Hit me up at tom@tomwanek.com.

And always remember … we’re in this together. I’ve got your back. I’ll see you real soon.

What Kenny Can Teach You About Persuasive Ad Writing

Transcript:

What’s one of the essential keys to becoming an ad-writing Wizard?

Tom Wanek here, and you’re watching Wizard Marketing TV where business owners learn persuasive tools and techniques to spark miraculous growth.

Stay tuned, and I’ll share my secret inspiration, and reveal how it taught me to become an ad writing wizard.

Kenny’s eyes embrace Rhonda’s furry blue coat the moment she steps on the bus for the first day of school. Rhonda’s the new girl in town, and she instantly rocks Kenny’s world.

Painfully shy and soft spoken, Kenny is unable to find the courage to tell Rhonda how he feels about her. So, he writes down his feelings each day in a diary, often describing what she wore that day and what he would say to her—only if he could.

Weeks later, Kenny learns that his good friend, Ted, is also smitten with beautiful Rhonda.

Yes, this must be some gal.

Funny thing is, Ted, too, is shy and isn’t quite sure what to say to Rhonda. So, he asks his pal, Kenny, to pen a love note.

Kenny agrees, and writes down everything he would say to Rhonda. See, writing is Kenny’s way of expressing his emotions.

Long story short, Ted signs his name to the love note, and wins the girl. But remember, it was Kenny’s note—Kenny’s words—that ultimately won Rhonda’s heart.

At age 11, Kenny “Babyface’ Edmonds is already a student of human behavior and a master of persuasion. He would go on to become a 10-time Grammy winner with 11 solo albums of his own.

Perhaps the greatest music writer and producer of our generation, Edmonds’ impeccably crafted explorations of love, romance and relationships have produced more than 125 Top-10 R&B and Pop hits ….

42 #1 R&B hits, and 51 Top- 10 Pop hits (including 16 #1’s) … all of which have produced single and album sales in excess of 500 million units worldwide for artists such as Eric Clapton, Aretha Franklin, Michael Jackson, Madonna, Mariah Carey, Toni Braxton, Beyonce, and Whitney Houston, among many others.

Confession time. I’m a sucker for love songs. Ballads are my favorite genre of music. And songs written by Babyface have always been among my favorite.

Most important of all, listening to his songs have helped me become a better ad writer. I’ve always been drawn to the way Babface avoids lyrical cliches, instead choosing unusual words in unusual combinations.

The way he makes up words like “Whip Appeal,” which describes a woman so beautiful that it’ll give your neck whiplash.

I appreciate the way Babyface just comes out and “says the thing” with incredible clarity.

But most important of all, I love how he taps into and speaks to the power of emotions.

Unusual words in unusual combinations … making up your own words … just coming out and saying the “thing” … speaking to the emotions that reside within your customer’s heart. These things will make you an infinitely better ad writer.

Now, am I suggesting YOU listen to love songs written by Babyface? Not necessarily. After all, that’s my inspiration … that’s my secret to ad writing success.

But what I really want you to do … what I’m really suggesting is that you feed your brain.

To become a better ad writer—to become a better marketer—you need to understand what makes people do the things they do. Psychology, neurology, music, art, poetry … these are all fabulous areas for marketing wizards, like you, to learn about human behavior and the power of persuasion.

Look around, inspiration is everywhere! What rocks your world? Take notice of it … deconstruct it. You won’t become a marketing wizard just by reading marketing books.

Got it? Good. Now go rock your world.

Now before you go, if you liked this video and found it helpful, comment below, give it a big thumbs up and share it with people you know.

Oh, and send me your marketing and advertising questions. Because I wanna help you, I’ll give you an answer right here. Hit me up at tom@tomwanek.com.

And always remember, we’re in this together … I’ve got your back. I’ll see you real soon.

What’s Holding You Back?

Transcript:

What are the impediments tripping you up or holding YOU back?

Tom Wanek, here. And you’re watching Wizard Marketing TV, where business owners learn persuasive tools and techniques to spark miraculous growth.

Keep watching, and we’ll discuss the limiting factors that’s keeping your business from reaching the next level. I’ll see YOU on the other side.

What’s holding your business back? In other words, what are the distractions and limitations preventing you from reaching your goals?

Okay, on the surface, this question is pretty straightforward.

But that doesn’t mean thinking this through will be easy. Identifying your company’s limitations takes energy. Focus. And most importantly, being completely clear-eyed and objective. After all, they wouldn’t call it a blind spot if you could see it.

First understand, no company is without shortcomings or weaknesses. And your limitations must be considered when crafting your marketing strategy.

Consider the following limiting factors:

  • Bad reputation
  • Long product purchase cycle
  • Shortfalls in knowledge or expertise
  • Financial troubles or concerns
  • Strong competitors
  • Limited market size or growth potential
  • Poor location
  • Inconvenient hours-of-operation
  • Inadequate staffing or recruitment
  • Insufficient systems and procedures

In the town in which I live, there’s a popular restaurant and bar that overcame its major limiting factor: the lack of growth potential due to it’s tiny little size. Truth be told, this place was a hole-in-the-wall.

A few years back, the restaurant owner purchased the adjacent building, knocked down a few walls, renovated, and added seating. His business boomed as a result. In fact, the restaurant quickly grew to fill capacity. Like a fish in a fish bowl.

Eager to grow even more, the crafty restaurant owner purchased the building’s upper floor, added some stairs, and opened a second floor that doubles as a party rental hall.

Not bad, eh?

But before you start tackling your limiting factors, keep in mind that not all weaknesses are worth strengthening. Every investment you make is a trade-off, carrying with it an opportunity cost. That said, your time might be better spent fortifying your strengths, not your weaknesses.

Harvard Business School professor, Youngme Moon says, “Ten years ago, Volvo was a brand known for its practicality and safety, whereas Audi was a brand known for its sportiness; nowadays Audi outperforms Volvo in safety tests, whereas Volvo advertisements work to assure customers that its cars are fun to drive.”

Safety gave Volvo a solid point of differentiation. Yes, the styling of its cars was a weakness, especially when compared to Audi. But that’s okay. At least Volvo stood for something. Sadly, the car company improved its styling — a perceived vulnerability — at the expense of safety, its core strength. As a result, Volvo weakened it’s position in the marketplace.

Marketing Wizards, take time to determine your company’s limitations. Find a someone who can see things clearly … someone who can point out weaknesses worth strengthening.

Cause, remember … how far you go and how fast you get there will largely be determined by your ability to overcome the things holding you back.

Now, Marketing Wizards … did you like this video? Then do me a solid and please subscribe and share it with people you know.

And let me hear from you. Send in your marketing and advertising questions. Hit me up at tom@tomwanek.com.

And always remember, my friend. We’re in this together. I’ve got your back. I’ll see you real soon.